By Mark McConville

ONE student has found a novel way to ensure he’s never late for class again after attaching a CHAINSAW to a child’s tricycle.

GEORGIA, USA: Dustin Sloan / mediadrumworld.com

Amusing video footage and pictures show the innovative student drive down a main road on his unique motorised trike.

Onlookers watch in awe as the tiny vehicle speeds by, with a 33cc chainsaw motor powering the children’s toy.

 

GEORGIA, USA: Dustin Sloan / mediadrumworld.com

The chainsaw tricycle was created by Georgia Tech students Dustin Sloan (21), from Millbrook, New York and Trenton Charlson (19) from Oconomowoc, Wisconsin.

“As ridiculous as it looks, it is very practical for getting around campus,” said Dustin.

 

GEORGIA, USA: Dustin Sloan / mediadrumworld.com

“I’ve taken it to class for two weeks, and it makes for fast, cheap transportation.

“A surprising number of students seem unphased by it, as Georgia Tech has become accustomed to home built student contraptions, but a few do laugh and get a kick out of it. Off campus I’ve had people come up to me and ask to take pictures and video of the trike.”

 

GEORGIA, USA: Dustin Sloan / mediadrumworld.com

The video shows the guys testing the children’s Radio Flyer tricycle, powered by a 33c chainsaw engine retrofitted with a modified clutch.

“Last October, I was at a thrift shop and saw a small chainsaw for a great price, and promptly bought it with plans to eventually attach it to something,” said Trenton.

 

GEORGIA, USA: Dustin Sloan / mediadrumworld.com

“Given Georgia Tech’s tricycle racing tradition, the Mini 500, we thought it was only fitting.”

“The trike is modified to accept a sturdier rear axle,” added Dustin.

 

GEORGIA, USA: Dustin Sloan / mediadrumworld.com

“On the first test of the trike, we tried to use the original rear wheels. They quickly failed as the spokes bent and broke.

“This meant getting new Colson wheels and machining new hubs to attach them to the rear axle.”

 

GEORGIA, USA: Dustin Sloan / mediadrumworld.com

The students have previous in this department having assembled an electric Little Tyke’s car in the past.

“Special thanks to the Georgia Tech RoboJackets robotics team, which we are a part of, for use of the shop-space and tools,” said Dustin.

 

GEORGIA, USA: Dustin Sloan / mediadrumworld.com

“It wouldn’t have been possible without some of the resources they provided.”

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