Disneyland Dumbo and Carousel. ANAHEIM, USA: Jeffrey Milstein / mediadrumworld.com

By Mark McConville

STUNNING aerial images have revealed an Aladdin’s magic-carpet-eye-view of Disneyland and Disney California Adventure Park.

 

Disneyland. ANAHEIM, USA: Jeffrey Milstein / mediadrumworld.com

The spectacular pictures from above show crowds of holiday-makers visiting Disneyland, including the iconic Disneyland Castle, central plaza and Storybook Land.

Other amazing snaps show Disney California Adventure Park illuminated at night by all the rides and attractions.

 

Disneyland Tomorrowland. ANAHEIM, USA: Jeffrey Milstein / mediadrumworld.com

The bird’s eye view photographs were taken by New York-based photographer Jeffrey Milstein, from Los Angeles, as he flew over the resorts in Anaheim, California, in a helicopter.

“I have primarily been shooting the manmade landscape from the air for the past six years,” he said.

 

 

Disney California Adventure Paradise Pier. ANAHEIM, USA: Jeffrey Milstein / mediadrumworld.com

“As a former-architect with an interest in graphic design, I look for dramatic light and patterns and geometry that make a well balanced and pleasing classical composition, while at the same time looking for pictures that show us something about our culture.

“I have a helicopter with the door off and I have the pilot make steep turns so I can lean out and shoot straight down.

 

Disneyland Frontierland. ANAHEIM, USA: Jeffrey Milstein / mediadrumworld.com

“It’s exciting and you see things you would never get to see and get to take pictures to show other people new things.”

Disney has the only private (non-government) restricted fly-over zone in the USA. The theme parks have the same protection as the White House, the Kennedy Space Center, and sporting events when it comes to restricted air space.

 

Disney California Adventure Paradise Pier. ANAHEIM, USA: Jeffrey Milstein / mediadrumworld.com

The theme parks received the flight-restriction status after the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the ban includes unmanned devices such as drones. Nothing can fly below 3,000 feet within three miles of the theme parks.

Mr Milstein, who used a Phase One IQ3 100-megapixel camera and Sony A7r2 to take the images, explained the challenges of photographing Disney from above.

 

 

Disneyland Castle. ANAHEIM, USA: Jeffrey Milstein / mediadrumworld.com

“Disney has a 3,000ft restriction, but there was also an ATC restriction because of nearby airports that kept us at 4,500ft,” he said.

 

Disneyland Storybook Land. ANAHEIM, USA: Jeffrey Milstein / mediadrumworld.com

“Other problems include getting the pilot to keep making steep enough turns as it’s a little stressful and the wind makes my eyes tear up so sometimes I can’t see through the viewfinder.”

LEAVE A REPLY