Drew Thomas Scavello / mediadrumworld.com

By Timmy Odejimi

 

BLEAK pictures show the crumbling remains of a derelict historic school building that has been deserted for over a decade.

 

The disturbing images display the leftovers of the lifeless late Victorian building, with wall paintings peeling away, heaps of unread textbooks scattered all over the floor, and bookshelves and desks cluttering empty classrooms.

Drew Thomas Scavello / mediadrumworld.com

 

Other eerie photographs show motivational posters, children characters and graffiti painted on the school’s walls and hollow hallways.

 

These thought-provoking pictures were captured in Rudolph Walton School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA by mail clerk, Drew Thomas Scavello (27), on a Canon T3i DSLR with an 18-55mm lens.

Drew Thomas Scavello / mediadrumworld.com

 

“What you see in these pictures is the death of education,” said Drew.

 

“What is most noteworthy though is the overwhelming silence – what was once a place of life, laughter and learning is now rotting and stands silent awaiting the inevitable demolition or possible redevelopment.

Drew Thomas Scavello / mediadrumworld.com

 

“The low angles and distance shots were taken to try and convey a sense of emptiness.”

 

Named after merchant Rudolph Walton, the school building was built just before the beginning of the First World War on February 28, 1914.

Drew Thomas Scavello / mediadrumworld.com

 

The late Victorian building was added to the National Register of Historical Places in 1986, but has been abandoned since 2003 despite efforts to re-open as a charter school.

 

Incredibly, Drew could gain access into the run-down school building even though it was a huge risk to take.

Drew Thomas Scavello / mediadrumworld.com

 

“The neighbourhood that Rudolph Walton school lies in is particularly dangerous, so it paid to keep my senses sharp I took the pictures,” said Drew.

 

“What I love about this type of photography is that it gives me the opportunity to share something with the world that most people will never have the opportunity to see.

Drew Thomas Scavello / mediadrumworld.com

 

“Through these pictures, I want the viewer to understand that the past is still alive today.”

 

For more information see www.mediadrumworld.com

LEAVE A REPLY